Bariatric Surgery
Weight Matters: When Willpower Isn't Enough

Weight Matters: When Willpower Isn't Enough

Most medical weight-loss programs first try to help you make the long-term behavioral changes necessary to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. This includes exercising regularly and eating healthy food. If you still remain seriously overweight, you and your doctor might discuss these options. More
A Guide to Bariatric Surgery
Deciding on Surgery
For the surgery to work, you must change your diet and lifestyle. In most cases, the surgery is not reversible. So if you’re considering surgery, learn all you can about it before you decide.
Types of Surgery
There are several different kinds of bariatric surgeries. An early version of the surgery, stomach stapling, has fallen out of favor because the newer surgeries result in greater weight loss.
After Surgery
Bariatric surgery will make it difficult for you to eat a large amount of solid food. After the surgery, you must eat very small meals. Eating too much or too fast may cause unpleasant symptoms, such as nausea.
About Obesity
We've all heard warnings, yet many of us keep gaining weight. More than half of American adults are overweight or obese, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Obesity in the News
Childhood Trauma Tied to Migraine Risk as Adult

Study found witnessing parental domestic violence produced most powerful association

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe Outdoors

Always make sure they're supervised

Health Tip: Should I Bandage a Wound?

Severity, size and location will help determine answer

Many New Teen Drivers 'Crash' in Simulated Driving Task

Study suggests despite getting licenses, adolescents lacked key skills to stay safe

Noise From Fireworks Threatens Young Ears

Expert advises families to sit at least 500 feet from launch area

Plane Passengers' Near-Death Experience Gives Clues to Trauma's Effect on Brain

Interviews, brain scans of people who thought they might die in crash show impact lasts for years

Americans' Risk of Dying From Cancer Is Falling, CDC Finds

But, due to aging population, actual number of cancer deaths is rising

Behind Many High-Achieving Children...

Is a parent who nurtured their development, study suggests

Children with Autism Respond Differently to Smells: Study

Kids with ASDs didn't change their sniff response when odors were unpleasant

Could Blue Eyes Raise Odds for Alcoholism?

Study finds genes that determine eye color line up along ones tied to alcohol abuse

Drug Offers Hope Against Disease Where Sunlight Causes Pain

Implanted pellet allows people with rare genetic condition to venture into daylight

Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis Shows Some Promise in Study

Lung function benefit was slight, but even keeping lungs stable would be improvement, experts say

Health Highlights: July 2, 2015
  • FDA to Weigh Safety of Giving Codeine to Kids for Coughs

  • Liberia Reports 3 New Ebola Cases

Health Tip: Help Curb Sleep Talking

Try to limit stress and anxiety

Health Tip: Pack Food and Water for Camping

Suggestions for safe storage

Many Americans Trying to Cut Their Salt Intake: CDC

Overall, half of adults surveyed recently said they were trying to avoid sodium

Mass Killings, School Shootings in U.S. May Be 'Contagious'

These events appear to inspire similar tragedies afterward, study suggests

Migraine's Link to Higher Heart Disease Risk May Not Be Genetic

Study suggests non-genetic factors may be what increases risk

Naps May Boost Worker Productivity

Hour of rest during the day seemed to ease impulsiveness and frustration, researchers report

Orkambi Approved for Cystic Fibrosis

When disease caused by mutated gene from each parent

Rapid Response Guidelines May Improve Children's Stroke Care

Researchers report treatment recommendations got kids evaluated faster in ER

Summer Danger: BBQ Grill Brush Wires Causing Big Health Woes

If ingested, stray wire bristles can pierce throat, intestines, public health experts warn.

Are Too Many Young Americans Getting Antipsychotics for ADHD?

Study shows rise in prescriptions for the powerful medications, even though they're not OK'd for this use

Do Cholesterol Drugs Affect Aggression?

Study finds it's possible, but more research is suggested

Extracurricular Sports May Give Kids' Academics a Boost

Study suggests these activities might improve kids' attention span, self-control

Fireworks Can Spark Bump in Air Pollution, Study Finds

July Fourth favorites release small particles that can harm the lungs, scientists find

Health Highlights: July 1, 2015
  • California Governor Signs Tough Vaccination Bill Into Law

  • FDA Mulling Restrictions on Liquid Nicotine Packs for E-Cigs

Health Tip: Log Symptoms in a Headache Diary

To help you better manage pain

Indoor Tanning Rates Decline As Cancer Warnings Mount

Study finds Americans are staying away from unhealthy practice in growing numbers

Many U.S. AIDS Patients Still Die When 'Opportunistic' Infections Strike

Study of San Francisco data for 1997-2012 shows 35 percent death rate over 5 years for these patients

Menopausal Women at Lower Heart Risk Than Men of Similar Age

Study found little difference between menopause types, but black women had less advantage than white

Obese Teens Less Likely to Use Birth Control

Heavy adolescent girls at greater risk for unintended pregnancy, study shows

Parents' Genetic Similarities Could Affect Kids' Height, Intellect

UK geneticists examine 'relatedness' and its impact on offspring in global study

Patients with Low-Grade Brain Tumors Living Longer

Chemo improvements have likely played a role, researchers say

Promise From a New Weight-Loss Drug

Two-thirds who took Saxenda lost 5 percent of body weight, study shows

Red Cross Urges Americans to Give Blood During Fourth of July

More than 40 percent of people will be away, but drive continues over holiday weekend

Surging Food Supply Linked to Global Obesity Epidemic

Boost in available calories comes largely from ultra-processed, inexpensive foods, expert says

Unapproved Ear Drops Targeted by FDA

These prescription meds have been available for years, but safety, quality are concerns

Weight-Loss Surgery May Beat Diet, Exercise as Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

After procedure, many patients no longer need medications, researchers find

A Healthy Body Often Equals a Healthy Brain

Experts stress that exercise, good diet help maintain memory as much as mental challenges do

Americans Want Online Access to Doctors, Health Records: Survey

But many are unaware of existing options, findings suggest

Beats Common to All Music May Bring People Together

Study suggests a few basic rhythms underlie music from around the world, pulling groups closer

Cystic Fibrosis Might Be Deadlier for Hispanics, Study Suggests

Genetic differences may thwart response to latest treatments, researchers say

Did One Gene Mutation Launch the Black Death?

Scientists find single change in the plague bacterium's DNA may have changed the course of history

Endurance Athletes Should Only Drink When Thirsty, Experts Say

Consuming excess fluids can lead to dangerous drop in sodium levels

Health Highlights: June 30, 2015
  • California Governor Signs Tough Vaccination Bill Into Law

  • FDA Mulling Restrictions on Liquid Nicotine Packs for E-Cigs

  • USDA Sets Out Healthier Food Options for Day Care Providers

Make CPR, Defibrillator Training Mandatory for High School Graduation: Experts

Having everyone learn these lifesaving interventions could boost cardiac arrest survival, panel says

Most U.S. Hepatitis C Infections May Be Missed: Study

In one state, only one from 183 diagnosed cases met reporting criteria for CDC

Scans Suggest Recurrent Depression May Take Toll on the Brain

Shrinkage seen in region where new memories are made

Too Few Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancers Get 'Watch and Wait' Approach

Study finds 12 percent or fewer getting active surveillance

Umbilical Cord 'Milking' May Help Preemies Delivered by C-Section

Gentle massaging can boost blood pressure, blood flow among these babies, research shows

Under-the-Tongue Hay Fever Pills Offer Little Benefit: Study

For serious grass allergy, shots may be more effective, researcher says

White Men May Get Better Treatment for Abnormal Heartbeat

Women and minorities with atrial fibrillation less likely to receive standard of care, study says

Women's Faces Are Redder During Ovulation, Study Says

But these subtle changes aren't detectable to the human eye

1 in 3 American Adults Owns a Gun, Survey Finds

Most are older white men rooted in a social gun culture

Can Orange Juice, Grapefruit Raise Your Melanoma Risk?

Study authors think compounds in citrus may sensitize skin to sunlight, but further study needed

Diabetes Rates Fall in Neighborhoods With Healthy Food, Parks and Gyms

Study suggests making these resources easily accessible, affordable might cut odds of disease

Fish-Related Food Poisoning in Florida Under-Reported

Survey finds many more fishermen sick after eating barracuda, grouper than previously thought

Flavored Cigarettes Still Popular Online Despite U.S. Ban

Continued interest surprises researchers

Health Highlights: June 29, 2015
  • Calif. Vaccine Bill Heads to Senate for Final Vote

Health Tip: Exercising With Heart Problems

Consult your doctor first

Health Tip: Sunburn May Cause Permanent Damage

Premature skin aging and skin cancer are possible

Heart Association's Stroke Guidelines Support Clot-Removing Device

If clot-busting drugs don't work, device can be used to pull the blockage out through the artery

Many Americans Wait Too Long for Needed Health Care: Report

Institute of Medicine experts say patient-focused system could help

Millennials More Accepting of Working Moms Than Past Generations

Survey responses reveal growing gender equality in U.S.

'Novice Driver' Car Decals Don't Cut Crash Rates: Study

Researchers suspect other restrictions for those with learner permits help to reduce accidents

Parents Should Set Good Example to Keep Kids Slim, Pediatrics Group Says

Avoid keeping sugary, high-calorie foods in the house, and encourage being active together

Parents, Stop Hovering: 'Risky' Play May Have Benefits for Kids

Less free-time supervision helps social development, and children get more exercise, experts say

Trauma, PTSD May Raise Women's Odds of Heart Attack, Stroke: Study

But the research didn't establish a cause-and-effect relationship

U.S. Kids Suffer High Rates of Assault, Abuse, Study Finds

Long-term effects include poor mental and physical health, experts say