Bariatric Surgery
Weight Matters: When Willpower Isn't Enough

Weight Matters: When Willpower Isn't Enough

Most medical weight-loss programs first try to help you make the long-term behavioral changes necessary to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. This includes exercising regularly and eating healthy food. If you still remain seriously overweight, you and your doctor might discuss these options. More
A Guide to Bariatric Surgery
Deciding on Surgery
For the surgery to work, you must change your diet and lifestyle. In most cases, the surgery is not reversible. So if you’re considering surgery, learn all you can about it before you decide.
Types of Surgery
There are several different kinds of bariatric surgeries. An early version of the surgery, stomach stapling, has fallen out of favor because the newer surgeries result in greater weight loss.
After Surgery
Bariatric surgery will make it difficult for you to eat a large amount of solid food. After the surgery, you must eat very small meals. Eating too much or too fast may cause unpleasant symptoms, such as nausea.
About Obesity
We've all heard warnings, yet many of us keep gaining weight. More than half of American adults are overweight or obese, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Obesity in the News
About 7 Percent of Kids Worldwide Have ADHD: Study

But some question accuracy of estimate

Brain Protein Tied to Alzheimer's Spotted in Young Adults

People as young as 20 have amyloid buildup, but researchers aren't sure what it means

Common Class of Drugs May Be Linked to Pneumonia Risk

But more research is needed before scientists say anticholinergics cause the infection

Crashes Cause Majority of Deaths for Truck Drivers

U.S. government report finds 1 in 3 who died weren't wearing seat belts

Fried Foods Tied to Raised Heart Failure Risk

Eaten regularly, they might boost chances as much as 68 percent, study finds

Health Highlights: March 3, 2015
  • Escape of Dangerous Bacteria in Louisiana Research Lab Remains a Mystery

  • Ebola Outbreak Slowing, But Fight Against Disease Must Continue: U.N.

  • U.S. Nurse Who Contracted Ebola Sues Employer

Health Tip: Count Your Calories

Are you trying to maintain, lose or gain weight?

Health Tip: Selecting Shoe Inserts

Suggestions for the right fit

Helping Student-Athletes With Mental Health Issues

Guidelines issued for U.S. high schools

In Vitro Births Continue to Rise in U.S.

Researchers also report drop in number of multiple embryo transfers, twin and triplet birth rates

Just How Big Is a Normal Penis?

Researchers size up thousands to arrive at averages

Kids May Be More Likely to Exercise When Friends Do

Study suggests that activity with peers might benefit overweight children

Obamacare and the Supreme Court: What's at Stake

Millions of consumers could lose health insurance subsidies in dispute over language in the law

Study Questions Close Monitoring of Thyroid Growths

Five-year follow-up shows the overwhelming majority remain harmless

Surgery Patients Might Not Need Sedative Before Anesthesia

Experts say trend in U.S. is not to give patients these calming meds before procedure

Typical Adult Over 30 Gets Flu Twice Every 10 Years: Study

Infection hits younger people more often, maybe because they mingle in larger groups, researcher suggests

1 in 5 U.S. Teen Girls Physically or Sexually Abused While Dating

National survey finds one in 10 teen boys also experiences dating violence

Any Exercise Is Good, But Higher-Intensity May Be Better

Brisk walking drops blood sugar more than a slower walk, study finds

Do Heart Surgery Patients Get Too Many Blood Tests?

New research raises concerns about the risk of anemia and blood transfusions

Doctors Often Yield to Parents' Requests to Delay Kids' Vaccines

But most believe it puts children at risk, study finds

Does Long-Term Acetaminophen Use Raise Health Risks?

Analysis of research says it's 'not a benign drug' if used long term and in larger doses

Growth Checks in Children Might Spot Celiac Disease

The gastrointestinal illness typically slows height, weight gains, experts say

Half of Known Strains of HIV Originated in Gorillas

Two of four classes of the AIDS-causing virus arose in these large primates, international study finds

Health Highlights: March 2, 2015
  • U.S. Nurse Who Contracted Ebola Sues Employer

  • Leprosy Cases on the Rise in Two Florida Counties

  • Antipsychotics Overprescribed to Seniors With Dementia: Report

  • Nearly 1 Billion Teens, Young Adults at Risk for Hearing Loss: WHO

Health Tip: Recovering From a Run

Drink fluids and eat a snack

Heart Valve Repair Surgery May Ease Mental Health Symptoms, Too

Researchers find procedure leads to reduced depression and anxiety

Love Coffee? Your Heart May, Too

Three to five cups daily appeared to lower risk of clogged arteries, study says

New York City Rats Carry Fleas Known to Transmit Plague

Researchers didn't find the Black Death bacteria, however

Nuts May Lengthen Your Life, Study Suggests

It hints, but doesn't prove, they might reduce risk of death from heart disease, other causes

Teens Can Easily Buy E-Cigarettes Online

Study finds minors successfully purchased smoking devices 3 out of 4 times tried

Tracking Brain Blood Flow May Help Predict Concussion Outcomes

In study, scans show reduced circulation in brains of football players who had not recovered from the injury

Very Obese Kids May Face Higher Heart Risks Than Thought

Study found half had high blood pressure, half had high cholesterol and 15 percent were diabetic

Nerve Treatment Via Nose Shows Promise Against Migraines

Therapy reduced pain level by about one-third for up to a month, study found

Ultrasound Treatment May Be Option for Plantar Fasciitis

Most patients found relief from foot pain in short study, but longer trials are needed, experts say

Tips for Safe Snow Fun

Winter sports account for more than 343,000 injuries in U.S. a year, experts say

1 in 5 Preemies With Lung Disease Exposed to Secondhand Smoke

22 percent were from what parents said were nonsmoking homes, study finds

Airport Screenings Miss Roughly Half of Sick Travelers: Study

Dishonesty among passengers about exposure to diseases biggest barrier to effective checks

Belief in Acupuncture Key to Effect on Back Pain, Study Suggests

Doctor says finding illustrates power of placebo effect

ER Physician Raises Concerns About Powdered Caffeine

One teaspoon of substance equivalent to about 25 cups of coffee

Global Blood Pressure Program Could Save Millions of Lives, Experts Say

Improving access to care, treatment is key, especially in lower-income countries

Health Highlights: March 1, 2015
  • Nearly 1 Billion Teens, Young Adults at Risk for Hearing Loss: WHO

  • Actor Leonard Nimoy Dies of COPD at Age 83

  • U.S. Military Ends Ebola Mission in Liberia

  • U.S. Abstinence Programs in Africa Ineffective Against HIV/AIDS: Study

  • Restrict Use of New Meningitis Vaccines: Experts

Health Tip: Offer Kids the 5 Food Groups

Here are suggested healthier choices

Hepatitis C Infections in Hospitals Show Need for Tight Infection Control Practices

In both cases, there were breaches in safety rules, CDC reports

Hospital Design May Not Boost Patient Satisfaction, Research Suggests

Aesthetics aren't as important as care from doctors, nurses and staff, study notes

Immune System Changes Tied to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Researchers saw evidence only in first 3 years of disease, findings could lead to early test

In Northeast, Weather Changes May Mean More Ticks, Earlier

Warming trend could affect the spread of Lyme disease, research suggests

Study Links Recession to Spike in Suicides Among Middle-Aged

Big jump in rates seen during 2007-2010, when U.S. economy was lagging

When Babies Spit Up, Don't Panic

Expert offers tips on lowering chances of episodes, knowing when to worry